The National Development Plan identifies a series of fault lines which need to be addressed to promote nation building. SASAS is examining many of these issues as part of annual data collection, these issues include social cohesion; quality of life and living standards; views on democracy and governance and politics. As regards links to Monitoring and Evaluation Plan / Government Outcomes, SASAS generates knowledge that is able to inform progress against Government Outcomes. The Outcomes that can be informed by SASAS include: Outcome 3 (Output 4, Manage perceptions of crime among the population); Outcome 12 (part A, Output 1: Service delivery quality and access); and Outcome 12 (part B, Outputs 1-3: Nation Building and National Identity; Citizen Participation; Social Cohesion).

SASAS themes are aligned to the South Africa's 10-Year National Innovation Plan produced by the Department of Science and Technology in 2007. In addition, SASAS informs the four thematic focus areas outlined in the Human and Social Dynamics in Development (HSDD) Grand Challenge Science Plan. For instance, in terms of Science, Technology and Society, SASAS has been making notable contributions towards the public understanding of science by examining attitudes towards biotechnology, climate change and the environment, indigenous knowledge systems, scientific knowledge and general attitudes towards science, energy attitudes and behaviour, as well as nuclear energy. The survey content is also closely aligned towards the 14 Strategic Priorities specified in Government’s Medium-Term Strategic Framework.

SASAS produces rigorous trend data about changes in people’s underlying values and has achieved recognition for reliable social indicators amongst policy-makers. The survey has demonstrated its utility as an anticipatory or predictive mechanism and has helped understand the socio-political climate in South Africa. SASAS has also exposed South African society’s political and cultural divisions (e.g. unequal opportunities and intolerance), as well as enabled policy-makers to detect impending changes in behaviour patterns.

The survey can inform decision- and policy-making processes. SASAS can produce rigorous trend data about changes in people’s underlying values and has achieved recognition for reliable social indicators and attitudinal measures amongst policy-makers. Consequently, the series is playing an increasingly salient role in the policy domain. The SASAS team has extensive experience in undertaking nationally representative surveys on topics relevant to policy-makers. Over the last thirteen years, the survey series has demonstrated its utility as an anticipatory or predictive mechanism. During this period, the survey series has helped us understand the socio-political climate in which we live our lives and form our views. The series has also exposed South African society’s political and cultural divisions (e.g. unequal opportunities and intolerance) as well as enabled policy-makers to detect impending changes in behaviour patterns.

Apart from modules directly commissioned and sponsored by government departments or national entities, which have already been discussed, SASAS results for government planning, monitoring and reporting can be accessed in one of two ways. First, SASAS provides government departments and entities access to SASAS data for further analysis.  Second, the government can make strategic use of SASAS-related articles published in the HSRC Review, and SASAS book series. Increased interest and uptake evident from these publications have been shown by DPME, Social Cluster and Parliament.